Reward and recognition: time for personalisation?

Tuesday 8th August, Quo Vadis, London
Tuesday 12th September, Quo Vadis, London

Are you recognised for all the good work that you do? How should you reward your employees? And do these strategies have the intended effect?

If customer experience (CX) has taught us anything, it is that customers value personalisation. Personalised experiences are perceived as more authentic, and therefore have greater influence over behaviour and buying decisions.

Yet we are only just beginning to understand how employee experience influences CX. Our recent topics on the role of HR and employee experience in CX have revealed that reward and recognition strategies are a powerful lever in influencing employee behaviour. But approaches to rewarding and recognising employees have so far failed to reflect the increased personalisation experienced by customers, leading to a potential risk of disengagement and underperformance.

As customer, employee, and digital experience mature, reward and recognition strategies must also evolve to match the sophistication and personalisation that CX is achieving. While tried and tested initiatives such as ‘employee of the month’ have had some positive impact, these formats increasingly lack the personal touch expected by younger employees who want to feel genuinely valued for their work.

During this topic, we’ll be asking:

  • What is the difference between reward and recognition?
  • What do both terms mean for millenials, and how do they influence behaviour?
  • Should we be rewarding the person or the employee?
  • What role does ‘thank you’ have to play? Is this reward, recognition, or something else entirely?
  • Who should be thanking who? And should this be done publicly or in private?

Book your place at the table to remain at the forefront of customer experience.

 

 

Independent Employee Experience?

Independent_CX

Should we be considering employee experience and customer experience separately?

Wednesday 7th June 10am – 4.30pm, The Aviator, Farnborough
Thursday 6th July 12pm – 4pm, Quo Vadis, London

Our previous topic explored the potential benefits for customer experience of a better understanding of the HR function. During the sessions, it became evident that there is a growing need to consider how the experiences of employees shape and influence customer experience. Specifically we need to ask the question: should customer and employee experience be considered together or viewed independently of each other?

There are two trains of thought. The first is that happy employees make happy customers from the point of view of their interaction. But there is a growing perception that developing a more comprehensive understanding of employee experience can drive a more consistent approach to people, and therefore to customers.

The second perception is that employee experience has the potential to change HR in the same way customer experience has changed customer service. Using the same tools and methodologies, HR has the ability to generate the insight and understanding that could truly elevate employee experience as a company priority.

Several forward-thinking companies, most notably First Direct, have succeeded in elevating employee and customer experience to ‘people experience’. Businesses that acknowledge the impact of employees’ experience on customers can achieve greater clarity of purpose and understanding. Moving to people experience opens the door to the development of perpetual experience, an approach that helps you ask the right questions for your specific context. Exploring employee experience is therefore a valuable way to help businesses respond to a rapidly changing environment.

Some of the key questions we will be considering are:

  • What is employee experience, and what is its role in customer experience?
  • What are the factors that influence employee experience?
  • How can placing greater focus on employee experience help businesses achieve their objectives?
  • And lastly, should employee experience be viewed independently of customer experience?

Book your place at the table to stay at the forefront of customer experience.

How can HR amplify customer experience activity?

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Tuesday 28th March RSVP Full day, Farnborough
Thursday 27th April RSVP Half day, London

For years now, we have known that the value proposition for employees is changing. While salary will always be a consideration, we are increasingly seeing the rise of fulfilment and purpose as important motivations for a workforce.

But can we even call them a workforce? Or are we just looking to employee people?

If customer experience activity is to bring about lasting change, the CX function must engage more effectively with Human Resources. The leaders in UK CX were combining customer and employee experiences several years ago by focusing on ‘people experience’, so this is not a new trend. But as experience increasingly becomes a key differentiator both within and outside organisations, there is a growing need to understand and fulfil the expectations of newer, younger employees in order to create a suitable value proposition.

This shift forces us to consider how we motivate people. While many companies have prided themselves in their pension scheme and their working environment, what behaviours do such considerations drive? And are they the behaviours that will drive the results we want?

At one extreme are companies with a frantic working environment – high pressure, high energy, and high stress. While some employees prefer this kind of environment and thrive in it, they know they will eventually burn out. At the other extreme we have the gigging economy, where workers are more concerned with flexibility and how much the role will strengthen their personal brand.

As experiences become the driving force of activity in organisations, there are opportunities for the CX function to become increasingly involved with the HR function. HR could well be the function within an organisation that is changing most quickly, and it is integral to the sustainability of all digital transformation initiatives. If companies are to deliver excellence in customer and digital experience, they must listen to the needs and expectations of new hires and learn how to respond effectively.

Discussions on this topic will focus on:

  • How can customer experience benefit from a closer relationship with HR?
  • How can we detect a changing landscape in our company?
  • How should we change our approach to recruitment?
  • How can HR help us bring about sustainable, lasting change?
  • How do we engage a broader range of employees in customer experience activity?

Book your place at the table to stay at the forefront of customer experience.